Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Facts are Stranger Than Fiction

I am drawn, as a reader, to detail-drenched stories about human lives affected as much by the internal as by the external, the kind of fiction that Jane Smiley nicely describes as “first and foremost about how individuals fit, or don’t fit, into their social worlds”. This kind of fiction is interested in the general as well…

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Rufaro Gwarada Reviews “We Need New Names” by NoViolet Bulawayo

In her debut novel, We Need New Names, 2011 Caine Prize for African Writing winner, NoViolet Bulawayo takes us on a journey through Zimbabwe’s Lost Decade as experienced by 10-year old Darling and her band of mischievous guava-stealing friends, Bastard, Chipo, Godknows, Sbho, and Stina. Darling guides us along as she and her friends transition…

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Remembering Chinua Achebe

I first read Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart when I lived in the Democratic Republic of the Congo—then known as Zaire. It struck me as a lucid, uncomplicated story that, in all its simplicity, was teeming with impetuous, emotional characters dwelling in a world of medicine men, spirits and pervasive superstition.  Honor and tradition were…

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A New Take on Land Reform in Zimbabwe

Jeannette Manjengwa, Teresa Smart, and Joseph Hanlon’s new book, Zimbabwe Takes Back its Land, presents evidence of smallholder farmers in Mashonaland Province, Zimbabwe making noticeable gains 10 years after the government of Zimbabwe instituted a controversial land redistribution program. Findings detailed in the book seem to echo data from a 10-year study in Masvingo Province,…

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Ng˜ug˜ý wa Thiong’o: In the House of the Interpreter

World-renowned Kenyan novelist, poet, playwright, and literary critic Ng˜ug˜ý wa Thiong’o gives us the second volume of his memoirs in the wake of his critically acclaimed Dreams in a Time of War. In the House of the Interpreter richly and poignantly evokes the author’s life and times at boarding school—the first secondary educational institution in British-ruled Kenya—in the…

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Moky Makura: Africa’s Greatest Entrepreneurs

The ‘one-on-one’ tells the story better. Having realized this, that area of writing called journalism developed what is called the personality profile. Soon this form of writing inside the craft was dubbed biographical journalism. I have a fetish for such writing. Follow @AfricaSpeaks4 Tweet

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